Top Three Reasons Why Structural Engineers Should Attend Webinars

We encourage all our employees to always keep learning and seeking out resources that can stimulate new ideas or help improve processes in their jobs. Webinars are a great way for you to stay engaged in your profession and learn new things about the industry. They mix the convenience of online availability with the interactivity of live seminars, and because some are free or offered at a much lower cost than live trainings, they make it even easier to stay up to date on current issues in your field. Our top three reasons why you should attend structural engineering webinars are below:

Close up shot of webinar on a laptop.

Close up shot of webinar on a laptop.

Some Webinars Offer Continuing Education Credits

Webinars for structural engineers can be very useful for staying current with professional development requirements. Look to see if the webinar you are interested in attending offers credits. Simpson Strong-Tie offers a wide range of webinars that allow structural engineers to earn CEU and PDH credits. There are plenty of other professional organizations that offer accredited webinars for structural engineers, also. Paul McEntee shares his list of recommended professional resources (including webinars) for structural engineers here.

Learn About Code Changes and Requirements

Staying up to date on code changes and requirements is one of the reasons why continuing education is so important. The Structural Engineers Association of California (SEAOC) has a helpful lunchtime webinar series that delves into 2015 International Building Code (IBC) changes. Simpson Strong-Tie webinars always review current code requirements for the kinds of structural design under discussion. For example, the Best Practices on Prefabricated Wood Shearwall Design webinar covers code reports on shearwall applications.

Learn About the Latest Products and Technology

 If you can’t make it to a live training session, using webinars to learn about the most recent products and technology is an effective way to stay current in the field. Whether you want to learn about the latest in prefabricated Strong-Wall® Shearwall panels or to gain fuller understanding of Best Practices for FRP Strengthening Design, webinars can help you design using the most advanced technology.

What was the best webinar you’ve attended? Why was it so good, or what was it you learned? Let us know in the comments below.

Resources and Continuing Education for Structural Engineers

I’ll admit that I’m biased, but structural engineers have the best job in the world. We’re needed to create safe sound structures while factoring in the effects of environmental forces using a combination of physics and experience. It takes a really well rounded individual to do all of that.

In my opinion, the key to being a well rounded professional is to never stop learning or seeking out new resources in your industry. I thought I’d share with you some resources that may be helpful to you as a structural engineer, from my own experience:

Continuing Education Webinars

Attending webinars online is a great way to get Continuing Education credits you need. Webinars enable you to stay sharp on topics that are continually changing and that you may need to adapt to in our industry.

Some of the resources engineers at Simpson Strong-Tie go to for webinars and CECs include:

ACI – American Concrete Institute

AISC – American Institute of Steel Construction

ASCE – American Society of Civil Engineers

AWC – American Wood Council

CFSEI – Cold-Formed Steel Engineers Institute

NCSEA –  National Council of Structural Engineers Association

SEAOSC – Structural Engineers Association of Southern California  

Engineering Associations

Training

Structural engineering associations often offer in person trainings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keeping in touch with fellow structural engineers means that you can talk shop and get some great advice about issues you face on the job. Some associations you can look into:

SEAINT- Structural Engineers Association – International 

NCSEA- National Council of Structural Engineers Associations 

SEAOC- Structural Engineers Association of California

SEAOSC- Structural Engineers Association of Southern California 

SEAOCC- Structural Engineers Association of Central California 

SEAOSD- Structural Engineers Association of San Diego

SEAU- Structural Engineers Association of Utah

ASCE- American Society Of Civil Engineers

ACI- American Concrete Institute

AISC- American Institute of Steel Construction

PCA- Portland Cement Association

PCI- Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute

CRSI- Concrete Reinforcing Steel Institute

AISI- American Iron and Steel Institute

Simpson Strong-Tie also offers great software resources for structural engineers and other building industry professionals. What resources do you recommend? Let us know in the comments below.